Warning: chmod(): Operation not permitted in /home/tradingr/public_html/wp-includes/nav-menu.php on line 502

Warning: file_put_contents(/home/tradingr/public_html/wp-includes/../.htaccess): failed to open stream: Permission denied in /home/tradingr/public_html/wp-includes/nav-menu.php on line 503

Warning: chmod(): Operation not permitted in /home/tradingr/public_html/wp-includes/nav-menu.php on line 504

Warning: touch(): Utime failed: Operation not permitted in /home/tradingr/public_html/wp-includes/nav-menu.php on line 508
Stock Market

Elliott’s Discovery Foretells Major Market Turn

Elliott’s 70-year-old forecast applies in 2012

By Elliott Wave International

Adversity often visits people just as their future seems brightest.

At the same time, other people learn that when one of life’s doors closes, a window will open.

Both of these truisms describe the life of Ralph N. Elliott (1871-1948), the founder of the Wave Principle.

In the 1920s, Elliott became a successful business consultant. But his life of accomplishment and financial independence were in peril when he fell gravely ill. During months of recuperation, Elliott occupied his mind with a meticulous study of the stock market.

In other words: The door closed and the window opened. At 67, Elliott made a discovery.

Through a long illness the writer had the opportunity to study the available information concerning stock market behavior. Gradually the wild, senseless and apparently uncontrollable changes in prices from year to year, from month to month, or from day to day, linked themselves into a law-abiding rhythmic pattern of waves. This pattern seems to repeat itself over and over again. With knowledge of this law or phenomenon (that I have called the Wave Principle), it is possible to measure and forecast the various trends and corrections (Minor, Intermediate, Major and even movements of still greater degree) that go to complete a great cycle.

Ralph N. Elliott, R.N. Elliott’s Masterworks, pp. 154-155

In 1941, Elliott drew a chart of his long-term forecast based on the Wave Principle. The final label on that chart is the year 2012! (That chart is republished in the February 2012 Elliott Wave Theorist)

Amazingly, wave analysis thus far confirms Elliott’s 2012 forecast.

In the August 2012 Elliott Wave Theorist, subscribers receive a specific stock market overview through early 2013.

Indeed, EWI’s timing tools appear pointed to the exact month of a major stock market turning point.

Two observations lead us to the same month for the last upside gasp in the stock market.

The Elliott Wave Theorist, August 2012

Imagine: Today’s price pattern is in line with a forecast R.N. Elliott published 70 years ago!

To that end, EWI offers you a no-obligation education in Elliott Wave analysis. See below for details.


Learn the Why, What and How of Elliott Wave Analysis

The Elliott Wave Crash Course is a series of three FREE videos that demolishes the widely held notion that news drives the markets. Each video will provide a basis for using Elliott wave analysis in your own trading and investing decisions.

Access the Elliott Wave Crash Course now >>

This article was syndicated by Elliott Wave International and was originally published under the headline R.N. Elliott’s Discovery Foretells a Major Market Turn Still to Come. EWI is the world’s largest market forecasting firm. Its staff of full-time analysts led by Chartered Market Technician Robert Prechter provides 24-hour-a-day market analysis to institutional and private investors around the world.

Your Cheatin’ Chart Will Tell On You

How the Dow Has Really Performed When Measured in Real Money (Gold)

By Elliott Wave International

“Your cheating chart will tell on you.”

Hank Williams may not have known about Elliott waves, but he did know when a story doesn’t add up.

Such is the case with the nominal rise of the Dow Jones Industrials from 2000 to 2007. In the language of country music, this stock index has a “Cheatin’ Chart” — it doesn’t tell the real story.

Download Robert Prechter’s FREE 40-Page Gold and Silver eBook. This valuable ebook explores the role of gold in today’s markets like no other resource has attempted. You will get more than Prechter’s long-term outlook on gold and silver; you’ll also learn how gold still plays an important role in determining the real value behind nominal share prices. Learn more, and download your Gold and Silver eBook here.

You don’t have to tell Bob Prechter this: He knows. A simple price chart of the Dow is, well, a bit too simple. First Bob explains that pricing via fiat currency is not the same as pricing the Dow in terms of real money (namely gold). Then he shows the difference.

For six long years, we’ve had declining real values in stocks. Since the 2002 bottom, we’ve had rising values in nominal terms. This is the same set-up that we saw in the early ’70s except for one thing: it’s bigger. . .Ultimately, real prices are leading dollar prices, and we’re going to see a tremendous drop in the dollar price of the Dow as well, because I’m making a case that this is a much bigger top.
Elliott Wave Theorist, December 2006

nominal dow follows the lead of real dow

If gold were our money, the major stock market indexes would have declined relentlessly from 2000 to the present, with a muted bounce in 2003. There would be no arguing the point of whether a bull or bear market was in force.
Elliott Wave Theorist, March 2006

This “oh-so-true” chart of the DJIA priced in gold showed the path that the “cheatin'” nominal Dow would eventually follow. Our forecast was that it’s just a matter of time. This analysis has played out as expected several times since the 1999 high in the Dow Jones Industrials.

The July 1999 top in the real Dow was the first in a long succession of rolling blow-offs that (The Elliott Wave Financial Forecast) successfully identified From the DJIA’s orthodox top in 2000 to the NASDAQ’s all-time high several weeks later to the top in residential real estate prices in 2005 to the nominal peaks in major stock indexes in 2007 to the wild commodity spikes in 2008, EWFF managed to anticipate many of the markets major trend changes. . .We owe these forecasting successes to the Wave Principle and its reflection of market psychology and its foreshadowing of larger social forces.
Elliott Wave Financial Forecast, July 2009

The monthly Elliott Wave Financial Forecast keeps a tireless eye on stocks, real estate, commodities and much more. We also keep track of the precious metals and the dollar — and even keep our finger on the pulse of developing social trends.

The quotes above confirm the power of Elliott wave analysis in identifying market turns in various asset classes.

Download Robert Prechter’s FREE 40-Page Gold and Silver eBook. This valuable ebook explores the role of gold in today’s markets like no other resource has attempted. You will get more than Prechter’s long-term outlook on gold and silver; you’ll also learn how gold still plays an important role in determining the real value behind nominal share prices. Learn more, and download your Gold and Silver eBook here.

Elliott Wave International (EWI) is the world’s largest market forecasting firm. EWI’s 20-plus analysts provide around-the-clock forecasts of every major market in the world via the internet and proprietary web systems like Reuters and Bloomberg. EWI’s educational services include conferences, workshops, webinars, video tapes, special reports, books and one of the internet’s richest free content programs, Club EWI.

What Can Movies Tell You About the Stock Market?

By Editorial Staff

The following article is adapted from a special report on “Popular Culture and the Stock Market” published by Robert Prechter, founder and CEO of the technical analysis and research firm Elliott Wave International. Although originally published in 1985, “Popular Culture and the Stock Market” is so timeless and relevant that USA Today covered its insights in a recent Nov. 2009 article. For the rest of this revealing 50-page report, download it for free here.

This year’s Academy Awards gave us movies about war (The Hurt Locker), football (The Blind Side), country music (Crazy Heart) and going native (Avatar), but nowhere did we see a horror movie nominated. In fact, it looks like Sweeney Todd, The Demon Barber of Fleet Street was the most recent to be nominated in 2008, for art direction (which it won), costume design and best actor, although the last one to win major awards for Best Picture, Director, Actor and Actress was The Silence of the Lambs in 1991.

Whether horror films win Academy Awards or not, they tell an interesting story about mass psychology. Research here at Elliott Wave International shows that horror films proliferate during bear markets, whereas upbeat, sweet-natured Disney movies show up during bull markets. Since the Dow has been in a bear-market rally for a year, now is not the time for horror films to dominate the movie theaters. But their time will come again.

In the meantime, to catch up on why all kinds of pop culture — including fashion, art, movies and music — can help to explain the markets, take a few minutes to read a piece called Popular Culture and the Stock Market, which Bob Prechter wrote in 1985. Here’s an excerpt about horror movies as a sample.

* * * * *

From Popular Culture and the Stock Market by Bob Prechter

While musicals, adventures, and comedies weave into the pattern, one particularly clear example of correlation with the stock market is provided by horror movies. Horror movies descended upon the American scene in 1930-1933, the years the Dow Jones Industrials collapsed. Five classic horror films were all produced in less than three short years. Frankenstein and Dracula premiered in 1931, in the middle of the great bear market. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde played in 1932, the bear market bottom year and the only year that a horror film actor was ever granted an Oscar. The Mummy and King Kong hit the screen in 1933, on the double bottom. These are the classic horror films of all time, along with the new breed in the 1970s, and they all sold big. The message appeared to be that people had an inhuman, horrible side to them. Just to prove the vision correct, Hitler was placed in power in 1933 (an expression of the darkest public mood in decades) and fulfilled it. For thirteen years, lasting only slightly past the stock market bottom of 1942, films continued to feature Frankenstein monsters, vampires, werewolves and undead mummies. Ironically, Hollywood tried to introduce a new monster in 1935 during a bull market, but Werewolf of London was a flop. When film makers tried again in 1941, in the depths of a bear market, The Wolf Man was a smash hit.

Shortly after the bull market in stocks resumed in 1942, films abandoned dark, foreboding horror in the most sure-fire way: by laughing at it. When Abbott and Costello met Frankenstein, horror had no power. That decade treated moviegoers to patriotic war films and love themes. The 1950s gave us sci-fi adventures in a celebration of man’s abilities; all the while, the bull market in stocks raged on. The early 1960s introduced exciting James Bond adventures and happy musicals. The milder horror styles of the bull market years and the limited extent of their popularity stand in stark contrast to those of the bear market years.

Then a change hit. Just about the time the stock market was peaking, film makers became introspective, doubting and cynical. How far the change in cinematic mood had carried didn’t become fully clear until 1969-1970, when Night of the Living Dead and The Texas Chainsaw Massacre debuted. Just look at the chart of the Dow [not shown], and you’ll see the crash in mood that inspired those movies. The trend was set for the 1970s, as slice-and-dice horror hit the screen. There also appeared a rash of re-makes of the old Dracula and Frankenstein stories, but as a dominant theme, Frankenstein couldn’t cut it; we weren’t afraid of him any more.

Hollywood had to horrify us to satisfy us, and it did. The bloody slasher-on-the-loose movies were shocking versions of the ’30s’ monster shows, while the equally gory zombie films had a modern twist. In the 1930s, Dracula was a fitting allegory for the perceived fear of the day, that the aristocrat was sucking the blood of the common people. In the 1970s, horror was perpetrated by a group eating people alive, not an individual monster. An army of dead-but-moving flesh-eating zombies devouring every living person in sight was a fitting allegory for the new horror of the day, voracious government and the welfare state, and the pressures that most people felt as a result. The nature of late ’70s’ warfare ultimately reflected the mass-devouring visions, with the destruction of internal populations in Cambodia and China.

Learn what’s really behind trends in the stock market, music, fashion, movies and more… Read Robert Prechter’s Full 50-page Report, “Popular Culture and the Stock Market,” FREE


Elliott Wave International (EWI) is the world’s largest market forecasting firm. EWI’s 20-plus analysts provide around-the-clock forecasts of every major market in the world via the internet and proprietary web systems like Reuters and Bloomberg. EWI’s educational services include conferences, workshops, webinars, video tapes, special reports, books and one of the internet’s richest free content programs, Club EWI.

What Does NOT Move Markets? Examining 8 Claims of Market Efficiency

How a 3-in-1 chart formation in cotton foresaw the January selloff

By Susan Walker

If everyone says that shocks from outside the financial system — so-called exogenous shocks — can affect it for better or worse, they must be right.

It just sounds so darned logical, right? Economists believe this trope to be true, mainly because they believe that investors are rational thinkers who re-evaluate their positions after every new bit of relevant information turns up.

Beginning to sound slightly impossible? Well, yes.

It turns out that logic is exactly what’s missing from this it-feels-so-right idea of rational reaction to exogenous shocks. Read an excerpt from Robert Prechter’s February 2010 Elliott Wave Theorist to see how Prechter deals with this widely held belief.

Find out what really moves markets — download the free 118-page Independent Investor eBook. The Independent Investor eBook shows you exactly what moves markets and what doesn’t. You might be surprised to discover it’s not the Fed or “surprise” news events. Learn more, and download your free ebook here.

* * * * *

Excerpted from Prechter’s February 2010 Elliott Wave Theorist, published Feb. 19, 2010

The Efficient Market Hypothesis (EMH) argues that as new information enters the marketplace, investors revalue stocks accordingly. … In such a world, the market would fluctuate narrowly around equilibrium as minor bits of news about individual companies mostly canceled each other out. Then important events, which would affect the valuation of the market as a whole, would serve as “shocks” causing investors to adjust prices to a new level, reflecting that new information. One would see these reactions in real time, and investigators of market history would face no difficulties in identifying precisely what new information caused the change in prices. …

This is a simple idea and simple to test. But almost no one ever bothers to test it. According to the mindset of conventional economists, no one needs to test it; it just feels right; it must be right. It’s the only model anyone can think of. But socionomists [those who use the Wave Principle to make social predictions] have tested this idea multiple ways. And the result is not pretty for the theories that rely upon it.

The tests that we will examine are not rigorous or statistical. Our time and resources are limited. But in refuting a theory, extreme rigor is unnecessary. If someone says, “All leaves are green,” all one need do is show him a red one to refute the claim. I hope when we are done with our brief survey, you will see that the ubiquitous claim we challenge is more akin to economists saying “All leaves are made of iron.” We will be unable to find a single example from nature that fits.

* * *

In his February 2010 Elliott Wave Theorist, Prechter then goes on to show charts that examine each of these claims that encompass both economic and political events:

Claim #1: “Interest rates drive stock prices.”
Claim #2: “Rising oil prices are bearish for stocks.”
Claim #3: “An expanding trade deficit is bad for a nation’s economy and therefore bearish for stock prices.”
Claim #4: “Earnings drive stock prices.”
Claim #5: “GDP drives stock prices.”
Claim #6: “Wars are bullish/bearish for stock prices.”
Claim #7: “Peace is bullish for stocks.”
Claim #8: “Terrorist attacks would cause the stock market to drop.”

To protect your personal finances, it’s important to think independently from the crowd, particularly when the crowd buys into what economists say.

Find out what really moves markets — download the free 118-page Independent Investor eBook. The Independent Investor eBook shows you exactly what moves markets and what doesn’t. You might be surprised to discover it’s not the Fed or “surprise” news events. Learn more, and download your free ebook here.


Susan C. Walker writes for Elliott Wave International, a market forecasting and technical analysis company.

Wall Street Hit by Drop in Consumer Confidence

By Leah Schnurr

NEW YORK (Reuters) – U.S. stocks suffered their biggest one-day decline in nearly three weeks on Tuesday after a sharp drop in consumer confidence heightened worries over one of the most vulnerable areas of the economy.

Consumer confidence in February slumped to a 10-month low as the short-term outlook on jobs worsened. Results from retailers added little hope, as bellwethers like Target Corp (NYSE:TGT – News) forecast a tepid performance in the first quarter.

“There’s a bit of an adjustment process in terms of the growth outlook as to what is going to be the major driver,” said Nick Kalivas, vice president of financial research & senior equity index analyst at MF Global in Chicago.

If “the economic outlook gets adjusted down, certainly the materials and semis would be the places to see selling,” he said.

Stocks associated with a strong cyclical upturn in the economy were hit. Top performers during last year’s rally, including technology, materials and energy stocks led the downside. Oil futures fell $1.45 to $78.86 a barrel, pulling the S&P energy index (SNP:^GSPE – News) down by 1.5 percent. Dow component Caterpillar Inc (NYSE:CAT – News) shed 2.4 percent to $56.66.

Chipmaker Intel Corp (NasdaqGS:INTC – News) dropped 2.4 percent to $20.38 and the PHLX semiconductor index (^SOXX – News) lost 2.8 percent.

The weak data added to the cautious tone before congressional testimony from Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke on interest rate policy beginning on Wednesday.

Meanwhile, a separate report showed home prices unexpectedly slipped in December, adding to concerns over the sustainability of the economic recovery.

The Dow Jones industrial average (DJI:^DJI – News) slipped 100.97 points, or 0.97 percent, to 10,282.41. The Standard & Poor’s 500 Index (^SPX – News) gave up 13.41 points, or 1.21 percent, at 1,094.60. The Nasdaq Composite Index (Nasdaq:^IXIC – News) was off 28.59 points, or 1.28 percent, to 2,213.44.

Overseas data set a negative tone early on with German business confidence falling unexpectedly for the first time in almost a year. The day’s losses reversed stocks’ recent trend and the S&P 500 racked up its worst decline since early February.

The broad index had risen in four of the past five trading days and posted weekly gains in the last two weeks.

Investors shied away from risk ahead of Bernanke’s testimony when he is likely to be asked about the Fed’s surprise move to raise the discount rate last week.

Home Depot Inc (NYSE:HD – News) was a bright spot, reporting results that beat estimates and raising its profit forecast. The Dow component gained 1.4 percent to $30.75.

Jason Weisberg, trader at Seaport Securities in New York, said the strong earnings season has been overshadowed by uncertainty about the political direction.

“The really nice thing is the guidance you’re hearing from corporations, it looks very good,” said Weisberg.

But discount retailer Target fell 1.2 percent to $50.06 after it gave a tepid view of its first-quarter outlook even as it posted a fourth-quarter profit slightly above expectations.

Popular Culture and the Stock Market

December 11, 2009
By Robert Prechter, CMT

The following article is adapted from a special report on “Popular Culture and the Stock Market” published by Robert Prechter, founder and CEO of the technical analysis and research firm Elliott Wave International. Although originally published in 1985, “Popular Culture and the Stock Market” is so timeless and relevant that USA Today covered its insights in a recent Nov. 2009 article. For the rest of this revealing 50-page report, download it for free here.

Popular Culture and the Stock Market

Both a study of the stock market and a study of trends in popular attitudes support the conclusion that the movement of aggregate stock prices is a direct recording of mood and mood change within the investment community, and by extension, within the society at large. It is clear that extremes in popular cultural trends coincide with extremes in stock prices, since they peak and trough coincidentally in their reflection of the popular mood. The stock market is the best place to study mood change because it is the only field of mass behavior where specific, detailed, and voluminous numerical data exists. It was only with such data that R.N. Elliott was able to discover the Wave Principle, which reveals that mass mood changes are natural, rhythmic and precise. The stock market is literally a drawing of how the scales of mass mood are tipping. A decline indicates an increasing ‘negative’ mood on balance, and an advance indicates an increasing ‘positive’ mood on balance.

[Read more…]