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chart patterns

Single- and Multi-Bar Price Analysis: Forecast the Markets

EWI’s Jeffrey Kennedy shows you what a simple price bar can tell you about a market

By Elliott Wave International

Senior Analyst Jeffrey Kennedy has spent over 15 years developing techniques to “read between the lines” on a price chart, and he shares some of his techniques with you in a FREE eBook: Learn to Identify High Confidence Trading Opportunities Using Price Bars and Chart Patterns.

You’d be amazed at how a simple price bar can provide you with so much information that can improve your trading success. In this excerpt from his eBook, Jeffrey explains how to interpret price bars and what that means for the subsequent market moves. Learn how you can download the entire 14-page eBook below.


Here’s a picture of two different price bars that we will consider to be daily price bars. What story does the single price bar on the left tell you?

Prices opened that day at the lowest price and closed at the highest price, which means that the buyers, or bulls, are in total control of the market. The bears have no power whatsoever, and, because the market closed so high, odds are that the price will continue up the next day. As I said, one price bar can give you tons of information about a financial market.

Now, look at the price bar on the right. It tells you a similar story in the opposite direction. Once the market opened, it got slammed to the down side. It stayed down hard all day and closed on the lows. A market like this is dominated by the bears, the sellers, and odds favor further decline the following day. It means that the bulls, or the buyers, have no control in this market.

Although these kinds of price bars are fairly rare, they may open your eyes to how much information a single price bar can contain, especially if you know how to interpret it.

These two price bars are more like what you will encounter every day.

The price bar on the left side shows that the bears, or the sellers, opened the market up and pushed it down a little bit. In a sense, they had some control, but not much. Then the buyers, or the bulls, took control of this market so that it closed above the open. This type of price bar shows up in an uptrending market.

Conversely, the price bar on the right often shows up in downtrending markets. It signifies that the bears control the market. You could say that the buyers gave it a feeble attempt early on, but by the close, the sellers had taken over. Closes don’t lie, and they are the most important item on the price chart.


Learn to Identify High Confidence Trading Opportunities Using Price Bars and Chart Patterns

When you look at a price chart, can you quickly spot the dominant trend? What about important reversals, or possible support/resistance levels?

EWI has just released a free 14-page eBook: Learn to Identify High Confidence Trading Opportunities Using Price Bars and Chart Patterns. Senior Analyst Jeffrey Kennedy has spent over 15 years developing techniques to “read between the lines” on a price chart, and he shares some of his techniques with you in this new resource. You’ll be amazed at how a simple price chart can provide you so much information that can improve your trading success.

Learn how to get your free eBook >>

This article was syndicated by Elliott Wave International and was originally published under the headline Single- and Multi-Bar Price Analysis: Could It Help You Forecast the Markets?. EWI is the world’s largest market forecasting firm. Its staff of full-time analysts led by Chartered Market Technician Robert Prechter provides 24-hour-a-day market analysis to institutional and private investors around the world.

Use Bar Chart Patterns To Spot Trade Setups

How a 3-in-1 chart formation in cotton foresaw the January selloff

By Nico Isaac

For Elliott Wave International’s chief commodity analyst Jeffrey Kennedy, the single most important thing for a trader to have is STYLE— and no, we’re not talking business casual versus sporty chic. Trading “style,” as in any of the following: top/bottom picker, strictly technical, cyclical, or pattern watcher.

Jeffrey himself is, and always has been, a “trend” trader; meaning: he uses the Wave Principle as his primary tool, along with a few secondary means of select technical studies. Such as: Bar Patterns. And, of all of those, Jeffrey counts one bar pattern in particular as his absolute, all-time favorite: the 3-in-1.

Here’s the gist: The 3-in-1 bar pattern occurs when the price range of the fourth bar (named, the “set-up” bar) engulfs the highs and lows of the preceding three bars. When prices move above the high or below the low of the set-up bar, it often signals the resumption of the larger trend. The point where this breach occurs is called the “trigger bar.” On this, the following diagram offers a clear illustration:

For a real-world example of the 3-1 formation in the recent history of a major commodity market, take a look at this close-up of Cotton from Jeffrey Kennedy’s February 5, 2010, Daily Futures Junctures.

As you can see, a classic 3-in-1 bar pattern emerged in Cotton at the very start of the new year. Then, within days of January, the trigger bar closed below the low of the set-up bar, signaling the market’s return to the downside. Immediately after, cotton prices plunged in a powerful selloff to four-month lows.

Then February arrived and with it, the end of cotton’s decline. In the same chart, you can see how Jeffrey used the Wave Principle to calculate a potential downside target for the market at 66.33. This area marked the point where Wave (5) equaled wave (1), a common relationship. Since then, a winning streak in cotton has carried prices to new contract highs.

What this example tells you is that by tag-teaming the Wave Principle with Bar Patterns, you can have a higher objective chance of pinning the volatile markets to the ground.

To learn more, read Jeffrey Kennedy’s exclusive, free 15-page report titled “How To Use Bar Patterns To Spot Trade Set-ups,” where he shows you 6 bar patterns, his personal favorites.


Nico Isaac writes for Elliott Wave International, a market forecasting and technical analysis firm.